Sunday Funnies – LOLs, April 10th, 2022

Oh oh oh, I’ve found it!

“Here’s an apocryphal story that I figure prominently in.”
A CIDUer received this in some email without source info, and passed it along. The artist seems to be Mike Gruhn, who posts cartoons to Instagram and here-and-there; and has his own site, called WebDonuts.  He had a feature called Caption Challenge or Caption Contest, which seems to end in 2015. A note on the WebDonuts site from 2019 indicates  that Instagram would be the place to look for his current material.

The mirror is sketched oddly and had me thinking for a second it was a cleaver! But thankfully, no!

CIDU Bill had saved this one to an unused draft dated 2019/08/17 and called “Strange Family”, as a CIDU:

Saturday Morning Oys – March 26th, 2022

After inserting this one here, I later found it discussed on Arnold Zwicky’s Blog, in his usual exemplary detail and scholarship.

I’ve also seen this with the speech bubble reduced to just the “It don’t mean a thing” part. Which might be even more fun.

Oh, he got us! It turned out not to be an oy about “Youth In Asia”!

Here’s an Ewww-Oy for sure:

Non-synchro

An acknowledgement of using the same joke, about four years later, when the similarity was pointed out. From “Monster Picnic” in June 2021 (hat tip to Why Evolution Is True blog in 2022 where I saw it):

And by David Borchard in The New Yorker in 2016:

Monster Picnic acknowledged Borchart’s priority in this Twitter thread (see replies too):

She didn’t save a place for the dog!

No, we’re not going to call this a synchronicity — there’s nothing surprising about seeing two Thanksgiving cartoons on Thanksgiving. But seeing both taking on the idea of special diets and restrictions is a nice pairing.

(I’m tagging The New Yorker though not sure that’s where the Roz Chast appeared.)

She didn’t save a place for the dog!

A Booth Scene

My first time reading the word “defenestration” was in the title of a story by Arthur C. Clarke, “The Defenestration of Ermintrude Inch”, appearing in the collection Tales from the White Hart. Subsequently, I learned the general uses of this funny word, and in particular in the nickname for some historical events, “The defenestration of Prague”.

My first encounter with the word “quantum” in other than a physics sense was in the title of a story by Ian Fleming, “Quantum of Solace”, appearing in the collection For Your Eyes Only. Subsequently, I rarely encounter any use other than something scientific.

My first exposure to the word “squalor” was in the title of a story by J D Salinger, “For Esmé—with Love and Squalor”, appearing in the collection Nine Stories. Subsequently, my foremost exemplar for the concept of “living in squalor” are the cartoons of George Booth.

This one was sent in by Stan, who says “Here’s one I didn’t get…or maybe it’s an, ‘Is that all there is? But what’s the joke?’ kind of thing. Anyway, I’m guessing she made scrambled eggs for dinner. What’s the joke exactly? Also, what is the cat doing? Is that part of it?”