Sentimental journey

A very touching moment; especially since, in the Harry Bliss world, it’s likely that the dog understands this well, and is pleased to have this news shared with him.

So it’s easy to understand: a sentimental interaction. But how do we understand this as a comic? Is there any sort of joke, or comedy, or humor (apart from calling positive toned emotions “a good humor”)? As our category asks, Is that all there is?

I knew I was using it yesterday

I guess I understand the main joke correctly — putting your right hand into the instrument’s bell is a technique used with the horn (French horn), and this guy has carried over the habit into his playing the trombone. But why is he at a doctor’s? Because it got stuck? Did he do that while playing? No, you couldn’t reach — so it was from the minute he picked it up? Weren’t there resources to go to before a doctor? The players in the low brass section of whatever ensemble he plays with?

Anyhow, let’s not let the horn theme pass without checking in with Flanders and Swann:

/

Keep up, and try to focus, okay?

From Brian in STL, successfully using the Suggest-a-CIDU form. His message starts from puzzlement, but arrives at a theory your CIDU editors are also happy with: It’s not entirely clear to me what’s going on. In a way, the first panels look like the preliminary sketches a cartoonist does. So is the coffee affecting him? Or is Jane now able to “focus” since she’s had coffee?

Do the macanudo

What actual painting is this scene based on?

I think it’s a famous one I can’t bring to mind.

But I can’t help thinking of Poussin’s A Dance to the Music of Time (banner to this post), which in turn I’m aware of mostly from its use in Anthony Powell’s A Dance to the Music of Time.

The Poussin has four figures (they could be the Seasons, or in Powell’s treatment the Kindly Ones, i.e. Furies), facing outward; while this scene has five, facing inward. The Poussin dates from 1634-1636, while this other scene with its contorted nudes surely is showing an influence of Impressionism or later.

Later: okay, I have been informed. It’s La Danse by Henri Matisse with versions from 1909 and 1910.

Do you have “The Philosophy of Modern Song”?

The questions keep branching out. What is the drawing meant to show? Empty spaces on the shelves? So then the geezer is being sarcastic about “I wouldn’t have any of that stuff in my library”? Or they really are audiobooks, on physical CDs with shiny plastic cases? And then Zack is dumbfounded because he has never heard of audiobooks? Or instead, Zack is dumbfounded because he is quite familiar with audiobooks, but always in electronic or virtual form and never before this in a physical recording?

Hard as snails

A CIDU from Dirk the Daring.

The BOB MANKOFF PRESENTS: SHOW ME THE FUNNY (ANIMAL EDITION) feed on Comics Kingdom seems to stick with some kind of animal for a week or two, then move on to a series with another kind. After a good run of ostriches, they have moved on to snails. I’m hoping for a visual to go with “Look at that S-Car go!”.

I can’t believe it’s not a synchronicity!

From Andréa, who points out for the synchronicity inspectors that although the Knight Life is a rerun or classic, its appearance on GoComics was 2022/11/08, same as the Candorville. The Candorville is a pretty good LOL at the end, too, despite edging up kinda near to partisan politics.

(Post-posting edit: As noted in comments, the following was the intended Knight Life, which actually uses the phrase “I can’t believe”.)

And for some additional fun on the “Can’t believe it” topic, Andréa also sends a link for this scene from The Vicar of Dibley. Impressive memory and facility from Emma Chambers, playing Alice.