Sunday Funnies – LOLs, December 18, 2022

From Ooten Aboot, with an illuminating commentary:

In 1874, a similar culture clash happened in real life when Montreal’s McGill University challenged Harvard to a two game “football” match. To McGill, “football” meant Rugby, while Harvard followed “Boston Rules”, a version of Soccer with limited catching and carrying of a spherical ball. The solution was to play one game under each set of rules. Harvard won the “Boston” game, while the Rugby result was a 0-0 tie. Nevertheless, Harvard apparently liked the McGill style and adopted similar rules, so that encounter with McGill may have been the origin of American Football as it known today.


A case of How to Respond to Critics?






Do the macanudo

What actual painting is this scene based on?

I think it’s a famous one I can’t bring to mind.

But I can’t help thinking of Poussin’s A Dance to the Music of Time (banner to this post), which in turn I’m aware of mostly from its use in Anthony Powell’s A Dance to the Music of Time.

The Poussin has four figures (they could be the Seasons, or in Powell’s treatment the Kindly Ones, i.e. Furies), facing outward; while this scene has five, facing inward. The Poussin dates from 1634-1636, while this other scene with its contorted nudes surely is showing an influence of Impressionism or later.

Later: okay, I have been informed. It’s La Danse by Henri Matisse with versions from 1909 and 1910.

Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween — a good excuse to post some monster-themed cartoons. Here’s a couple that might fit into a Halloween-themed library.



This man isn’t worried that he’s out of candy, because he’s planned ahead.


If there is something left, it might not be the good stuff.

Andréa sent in this ThatABaby, and reminded me of an earlier CIDU discussion of Candy Corn: https://cidu.info/2020/09/07/ot-candy-corn/#comments

One measure of how influential Peanuts was is how familiar the Great Pumpkin is to us all.


First mention of the Great Pumpkin, October 26, 1959. You can follow this arc at https://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1959/10/26


Some veggie substitutes work out well. Others …

So, Monty Python’s science was right!


If you’re partying tonight, party responsibly!

Andréa sends in this synchronicity. Cartoonists are always looking for a new angle, but sometimes push it too far.


Finally, like that house at the end of the night that gives out multiple candy bars so they won’t eat them all themselves, there’s this bonanza from John Atkinson — some cartoonists would have spread these out one at a time, and gotten a whole month out of this idea.


Breaking the Fourth

I’m delighted with how the Bizarro  literalizes the idea of the fourth wall.

So then the problem-solvers’ question is “what are we seeing on the left side of the drawing?” And the answer should be “The adhesive side of the wallpaper”.

The contributor sending in the Macanudo points out that it’s a very old joke (probably could be found in Mutt & Jeff 🙂 ), but this is still a very good realization of the idea.

And they pair well because the Macanudo is at the other end of sticking to the metaphorical.

P.S. Wayno prepares two versions of each Bizarro he makes, a squarish panel and a more horizontal strip format. Occasionally in his weekly blog he shows the variation, and in the week covering this cartoon it was the one getting that treatment. Here is that alternate image: