Saturday Morning OYs – September 10th, 2022

Several OYs from Andréa who says “Today must be Pun Day, rather than Labor Day . . . altho some of these puns could be considered quite labored . . .”.

Pedants / experts, have at it!


And another batch stamped “From Andréa” :

Saturday Morning Oys – July 16th, 2022

I think this counts as a pun, even without doing a pun-joke.

The above sent by Andréa, who particularly notes Tom Waits getting mentioned, saying “Never thought I’d see HIM in a comic – made my day!”. And one of your editors had the pleasure of taking a couple classes from Professor Lance Rips, who liked to point out that his name constitutes a complete sentence.

Meant to post this earlier.

And the award for the best re-use of old toy parts goes to …

I learned the word prodigal in the context of the Parable of the Prodigal Son, and thought it meant something like all the characteristics of the guy in the story – wandering, absent, returning after a long absence and acting all entitled, etc, all packaged in that one word. Only much later did I start seeing contexts that wouldn’t support all of that meaning, and learned the base sense spending money or resources freely and recklessly; wastefully extravagant.

And then discovered that was what it meant in the Parable, too. But there had not been enough help from the context to make that choice clear! And this fits the philosopher’s point that, if your informant points to a rabbit and says gavagai, maybe they are telling you the word means rabbit — but maybe it means finger.

Saturday Morning Oys – July 9th, 2022

Thanks to Dale Eltoft for sending in the second Diamond Lil in the pair below. “This follows from the day before but I don’t know if that’s a necessary setup.” On that recommendation we’re also including the set-up one first, though it isn’t in itself an OY.

(In a followup, they make it clear that you better say it in the pun way or there is no joke left!)

I’m in an online class that’s reading Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, and whenever I run into an invisibility-themed cartoon I have the impulse to upload it to the class discussion board. But that would be unwise.

Oy! this is so labored of a pun — but sometimes you just have to honor that labor! (Also interesting how there had to be a switch of syntactic role of me in the last panel.)

Added Thursday – This cartoon was the main topic of an Arnold Zwicky post on his blog, which says a lot more than my remark above on the parsing of the punned title in the last panel; and also brings up Stephan Pastis as a mainstay of this genre.

A multi-OY from Cat and Girl, with e3xtras from meme-land.

Saturday Morning Oys – June 4th, 2022

This Mother Goose and Grimm is analyzed at Arnold Zwicky’s blog.

I also posted this F-Minus, with remarks, in a comment on that same Zwicky blog entry.

Several selections contributed by Andréa coming up:

“I KNEW IMMEDIATELY WHO THIS WAS, EVEN BEFORE READING THE CAPTION . . . DOES THAT MAKE ME A GEEZER??”



Synchronicity–


This Bizarro from Andréa is also taken up under the Arnold Zwicky analytical microscope. I like his term “a Desert Crawl cartoon” for the main trope here.


“SYNCHRONICITY – ABOUT *NOT* LEARNING A LESSON . . .”


And one final OY contribution:

Sunday Funnies – LOLs, May 8th, 2022

Perhaps over-familiar as a mental-health joke, but enough original twist to make it funny.

One (and done) from Andréa, and extracted from a Loch Ness synchro:
Sent by Dana K, who says “Same thing Abe Lincoln was getting at when he spoke of “government OF the people and BY the people and FOR the people”.

Saturday Morning Oys – April 23rd, 2022

Thanks to Andréa for this subtle groaner:

And another from Andréa:

Sources say that either the exclamation “Great Scott” is not attached to any particular person with that name; or else may be associated with Sir Walter Scott, or with U.S. General Winfield Scott. But here, with the talk of Antarctica and the South Pole, surely they intend some kind of glance at famous and unfortunate polar explorer Robert F Scott?

And another from Andréa, who calls this “Barely an oy”. Also fodder for you dialectologists out there.