Saturday Morning Oys – April 2nd, 2022

My attempt to look up whether the first two panels have the accurate tartans for those clans was hampered by starting from a position of zero knowledge, and by what turned out to be a huge set of variants for any name. However, most samples of Sinclair Modern seem to have a lot more red than in the comic. Shrug. Anyway, the pun is in panel 3, and is pretty good.

It’s not uncommon for these two guys to end a conversation with that mutual exchange of “What?”. And actually I’m generally quite content with that and wouldn’t demand more punchline delivery.

When I first heard about a State of the Union speech I figured it must be to announce an award, and wondered if Florida had a chance.

Saturday Morning Oys – January 15th, 2022

We can discuss how dictionaries work, but I think I’m seeing (at https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/fugue and https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fugue ) that the musical and the psychiatric meanings of fugue are senses listed in one word entry, with just one etymology section for the joint entry — thus, that they are the same word historically. Etymonline is not helpful this time.
Not only is this playing between the musical and psychiatric senses of 𝘧𝘶𝘨𝘶𝘦, the caption depends on 𝐴 as both a musical key and the indefinite article, and 𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘰𝘳 as both musical mode and an age classification.

P.S. This cartoon along with an earlier Bizarro and other aspects of fugue, minor, a-minor, and somehow emo, are all fodder for Arnold Zwicky’s blog.

Guess the punchline (an oy)

When I saw the first panel I knew what the second one would be! Ókay, it’s corny and obvious — but that’s what’s fun about it.

Here’s your chance to duplicate that experience.

First:

And here the answer (slide up to uncover):

Saturday Morning Oys – August 28th, 2021

This was a momentary CIDU, for want of a comma. Sent by Boise Ed. Ed did some research on our behalf and reports “If you look in the [GoComics] comments, you’ll see that it caught Mark Parisi by surprise.”

And a longer-puzzling CIDU-oy: I still can’t figure out the intended real-life musical pair being referred to. (Searching got me to an article mentioning opera director Robert Carsen and “superstar soprano Renée Fleming” — but the characters in the cartoon are not doing opera.)

Saturday Morning Oys – June 26th, 2021

A paradigmatic LOL-OY from Pearls:

And it’s a double-PBS week with this one from Stan:

And Stan further suggests you need geezer credentials to get the reference in this Oy-LOL, but it shouldn’t be hard for any cohort to pick up on:

A pair (will it continue?) of Oy-based punch lines from Keith Knight.
Bet “pleased to meat you” will not become the hot new greeting this year..
(Okay, these are not currently dated.)

Saturday Morning Oys – November 28th, 2020

From Andréa.

Below from Anon:

Above from Andréa.

Mitch4 says: My turn to be stupid — I looked at this and thought “Okay, decent pun, taking pro-biotic as contrast to amateur-biotic. Hey, we could also imagine pro-biotic as trying to be opposite of anti-biotic, wouldn’t that be inventive? If only there were such a term … “