20 Comments

  1. I’ve actually thought that “Malvolio’s Revenge” would be a great sequel to Twelfth Night.

    But who is “Anansi”? Is this supposed to actually be Hamlet or someone else?

  2. I assume Anansi is the spider, and that the person depicted is a regular in the comic rather than literally Hamlet.

  3. Right. But if he isn’t Hamlet, why is he digging up Yorick’s skull at all? That isn’t something somebody else is likely to do.

  4. @ignatzz: ” But if he isn’t Hamlet, why is he digging up Yorick’s skull at all? That isn’t something somebody else is likely to do.”

    Halloween is approaching, and some people are too cheap to spend a couple of bucks for a plastic or rubber skull for their window sill?

  5. @ Walter Morris – Thank you VERY much for sharing that link. The text version was funny enough, but the rendition offered (for free) on the FuMP website is truly superb.

  6. “I assume Anansi is the spider, and that the person depicted is a regular in the comic rather than literally Hamlet.”

    Think of it as Mr. Peabody meeting Christopher Columbus.

    Anansi the spider is a regular main character. Hamlet, yes it is the literal Hamlet, is a recognizable cultural reference and the subject of this one strip.

    As a one-off it’s a bit confusing as Hamlet referring to Anansi familiarly by name but in a context that usually involves Horatio so a casual reader can’t be sure of the ongoing relationship and expectation. But basically it is a regular character (Anansi/Mr. Peabody) meeting a cultural reference (Hamlet/Christopher Columbus) in the context of the reference but as a cartoon.

  7. Mitch4: If I type “I knew him…” into Google, the 2nd autocomplete suggestion is “well,” so I’m going to guess no.

  8. “Do people still go around saying it as “I knew him well”, or have the corps of quote-correctors extirpated that habit?”

    In the world of Web Comics. No-one would dare make that mistake. In the world in general…. I dunno.

  9. Anansi the spider is a character from African folklore. I think one of the Kwanzaa sequences that used to run in Curtis featured Anansi.

  10. “‘@ignatzz: ” But if he isn’t Hamlet, why is he digging up Yorick’s skull at all? That isn’t something somebody else is likely to do.’
    Halloween is approaching, and some people are too cheap to spend a couple of bucks for a plastic or rubber skull for their window sill?”

    Grave-robbing is still a thing, even if nowadays they like to call it “physical anthropology”.

  11. Woozy, judging by the ticked-off body language of the skeleton, if he doesn’t get his head back, things will get ugly for Mr. Hamlet.

  12. @ Chak – I think the resemblance is intentional. The gaps in the pelvis look like angry “eyes”. Even though the “face” is in the wrong place, it still has a psychological impact, magnifying the effect of the posture that Grawlix mentioned.

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