22 Comments

  1. I don’t quite get the Buick burial one. But I appreciate that Alan Smithee was able to take time from his busy film directing career to clip and send this one in.

  2. Mitch4, my take is that the decedent was a mechanic who spent his happiest hours under cars, of which Buicks were his favourites, and wanted to spend eternity that way.

  3. Ooten Aboot, Mitch4 – I see it as a way of showing how the other mechanics will remember him. As a mechanic he would have spent long hours under a car with just his feet hanging. He is being remembered in death how he was seen in life.

  4. I thought the same as Bill. It’s a funny joke, but in reality a ventriloquist does more than just talk for the dummy. Having him pulling on an imaginary rope would be quite impressive.

  5. Mitch4, I decided it would be a good solution for when somebody sends in a comic but requests that his or her name not be listed.

  6. Ah, thanks Arthur, that’s much better. I was figuring a normal human crew but for some reason the ship was on a tree-collecting mission, and previous catches were what we were seeing.

  7. The “Smithee” credit was worth a good chuckle as a one-timer, but in general I think the solution you used for the first and the last comics in this post is better: just omit the name.

  8. Re Alan Smithee — I just read a 1940s Hollywood detective novel which reminded me that “George Spelvin” was apparently also in use as a “Smithee” type name for any actor feeling the need to use. There were apparently other traditional go-to names as well..

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Spelvin

  9. Ah, yeah, I saw that on a third viewing. I thought it was something along the lines of he was too snooty be rescued by a cruise ship, or they were too snooty to rescue him.

  10. Well, I don’t blame Larson for stealing these ideas, after all, it’s tough to have to come up with a good joke every day, day in and day out, and even though he quit early, he did have a nice long career. Guess he wanted to get out before all the plagiarism caught up with him.

Add a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.