23 Comments

  1. I’m sure that the “chuic” was intended as onomatopeia; the appropriate “translation” would have been “kiss“, “peck“, or “smooch“. Liniers has provided a simple scene to brighten our day, rather than complicated humor:

  2. In the US, the USDA has defined bushels by weight. Each grain has its own standard, from wheat at 60 lbs to oats at 32. Of course, this throws off the whole peck comparison, which is pretty loose to start with. US and Imperial pecks are different, and depending on the crop, 4 pecks can be significantly less than a bushel.

    In conclusion, Go Metric!

  3. Mitch4: Wow. That’s just bizarre. OTOH I have a digital scale that measures in four ways: ounces, grams, ml, and fluid ounces. Really irritates me, as when I switch modes I have to skip the two stupid ones every time.

  4. As Kilby described, “smack!”, with its own exclamation point, was the definition I found most often.
    there was also a language usage that said: “The little one makes me [chuic, chuic, chuic].” (with my leaving the 3 “chuic”s in Spanish) (I lost the reference.)

  5. phsiiicidu: The nice thing about the four measuring units is that ml=grams and fluid ounces = ounces. Which isn’t true, of course, for 90% of what I measure – but it means that if I need, say, 17 ounces I don’t have to go to lb oz and make it 16.1, I can just measure 17 fl oz. I agree it’s really stupid, though.

  6. ah, I knew, of course, that they were the same (as far as the scale is concerned!) but hadn’t ever looked at “fl oz” to realize that it’s just a number. I was doing 22oz yesterday, had to spend an extra .001 second noting that it was 1lb6oz!

  7. (I think I commented this once before!)

    The rough equivalence of oz and fl.oz is captured in the old saying “A pint’s a pound / The world around.”

  8. Mitch4: Except in the UK, where it’s 568ml…kinda funny that a country whose currency is called the “pound” doesn’t know how to measure! /s

  9. Also – a British pint and an American pint aren’t the same. Nor are their fluid ounces (though that’s a small difference). And it depends what you’re weighing (which is the whole point of why having volume measures on a scale is silly…).

    An American pint is 16 fl oz. A British one is 20 fl oz (the fluid ounces are smaller, but not enough to make those the same size). A British pint is 568ml; an American is 473ml.

    Or why British beer glasses are larger than American, even when they’re both “pints”…

    Two countries divided by a common language (and measurement system… Or traces of same).

  10. I bought an interesting coin from a coin dealer. It was a United States one-pound silver coin. Have you ever seen such a thing? You may have seen a U.S. one ounce silver coin, but this one had the diameter of a small dinner roll. This was way back when silver was about $10 per ounce.

    I said I’d buy it and he said, “OK, 16 ounces at $10 …” I said, “No, 12 ounces at $10.” He said, “Right, 12 ounces at $10 is $120.”

    For some reason people don’t believe me when I tell them this story. They insist the coin dealer was right the first time, and there are 16 ounces in a pound of silver.

    What’s heavier, a pound of feathers or a pound of gold?

  11. My mother used to sing the bushel and a peck song. And a hug around the neck. And a barrel and a heap and I’m talking in my sleep about you.

  12. Is that from Troy measures?

    I remember vaguely that there were three big ones: avoirdupois, troy, and apothecary.

    When I worked in a pharmacy we did have minims.

    I always wondered whether avoirdupois was from a name or could be parsed – to have of pois.

  13. larK: There was a time when a pound sterling was the value of a pound of silver, but that was long ago. Yes, in Troy weight, 12 ounces make a pound. The ounce is heavier than the avoirdupois ounce but the pound is not as heavy as the avoirdupois pound. So an ounce of gold weighs more than an ounce of lead, and a pound of lead weighs more than a pound of gold. Lead somehow didn’t make it into the precious metals club and so it’s measured in avoirdupois.

  14. Geez, the comments about “I Love You a Bushel and a Peck” sure make me feel old. It’s from the stage version of Guys and Dolls and was a popular song for a while.

  15. @jjmcgaffey

    “which is the whole point of why having volume measures on a scale is silly…”

    I give you ‘cups’…

    “An American pint is 16 fl oz. A British one is 20 fl oz (the fluid ounces are smaller, but not enough to make those the same size). A British pint is 568ml; an American is 473ml.”

    Our gallons are bigger too – an Imperial gallon is 8 Imperial pints.

    And a standard sized bottle of spirits used to be 26⅔ fl.oz.

    “Or why British beer glasses are larger than American, even when they’re both “pints”…”

  16. That’s why Americans don’t understand the character in George Orwell’s 1984: ‘E could ‘a drawed me off a pint,’ grumbled the old man as he settled down behind a glass. ‘A ‘alf litre ain’t enough. It don’t satisfy. And a ‘ole litre’s too much. It starts my bladder running. Let alone the price.’

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