8 Comments

  1. “Silly old bear” is Christopher Robin’s catchphrase. He usually says it lovingly, but when he says it in this comic, he seems to be annoyed by the silly joke that Pooh is making.

  2. This cartoon appears to be based on the Disney version of Winnie-the-Pooh rather than the illustrations in the book. Poor Pooh-bear appears to have spent too much time hanging out with the Disney characters, and adopted their habit of appearing in public without any trousers on.

  3. Sheep’s explanation @1 is perfectly correct, but I still have two problems with this comic. One is a simple defect in the artwork: the color of the nose on the “Groucho” glasses should have been pink, or at least a different shade of brown from the rest of the fur, so that it would be clear that the nose was not attached to the bear. However, that was the syndicate’s fault, not Leigh Rubin’s, since he normally submits monochrome line drawings.

    The second issue is more serious: I’m just not comfortable about using a defenseless (dead) person for a gag like this. Even though the comic is (generally) in the spirit of the books, and nobody has been “abused” by being put into any kind of unsavory situation, it is nevertheless manipulating the memory of a real person, who already suffered enough by having his alter ego appear in print form.

    To paraphrase from Harry Rowohlt’s (German) obituary for Christopher Milne: “[he] lived withdrawn and just above the poverty line, as a bookseller, carpenter, and author, having been robbed of his childhood, his youth, his life as an adult, his legacy and fame as an author, [just] because he was so unlucky as to be the most famous little boy in all of literature.

  4. Pooh walks up in the disguise glasses and nose (these glasses are very well known for this). He says to Christopher Robin, “Bet you can’t guess who I am!”
    And that is the point where this comic enters.

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