20 Comments

  1. Jango was Bobba’s father right? So all the clones that had children are showing up as his.. And maybe the clones as well.

  2. It was revealed in Star Wars episode II (“Attack of the Clones”) that all (or most) of the soldiers in the Clone Wars were clones of Jango Fett. (Boba Fett from episode V (“The Empire Strikes Back”) was also his clone.)

    Therefore, when he gets the results from the genetic test back from a company named “23 Million and Me” (which is a pun of “23 and Me”), he sees he’s closely related to many, many people — as if they were all twins.

  3. I understand the intent of the joke, but the 23 in “23 and Me” refers to the 23 human chromosome pairs, not the number of people related to you.

  4. 23 000 000 names, 8 names on a page; 500 pages are approximately 2 inches thick; the resulting pile of paper should be as high as the Eiffel tower…

  5. “I understand the intent of the joke, but the 23 in “23 and Me” refers to the 23 human chromosome pairs”

    Jango lives in a galaxy populated by WAY more than just humans. Why would the company limit itself to just serving humans?

  6. If I got it, it can’t be *that* obscure knowledge….

    Also, there’s nothing wrong with a strip using obscure knowledge.

    (But I missed the “23 and Me” reference….)

  7. @ J-L – Boba Fett was a clone, but his growth was not “accelerated” (nor was he indoctrinated) like the rest of them.

  8. woozy, if you asked me ten minutes ago, I would have said Boba Fett was the fat dude who kept Princess Leia as a slave.

    I was done with Star Wars after the first trilogy (which is now the second trilogy, whatever), and I wasn’t really giving it my full attention even then.

    I’m vaguely aware that there were clones in the now-first trilogy, but only because they were in one of the titles.

  9. “if you asked me ten minutes ago, I would have said Boba Fett was the fat dude who kept Princess Leia as a slave.”

    No, that was Yoda. Get your facts straight!

    😉

  10. Ah, thank you Bill and others, “Boba Fett” has been my long-standing example of a name the real fans toss around but I felt sure I had never heard of in watching the films.

    This started coming up around the time there was some sort of edited reissue and fans were consumed by arguing over “who shot first”. I sort of thought a “Boba Fett” was a character introduced by that same round of revision.

  11. Bill, if you are such a non-fan, how did you even know it was a Star Wars reference.

    Boba Fett was the bounty hunter that captured Han Solo in the Empire Strikes Back and is comically killed in Return of the Jedi. He is very peripheral but had, as is the way with these things, huge cult status (maybe because he had a cool costume— who knows). Because he has such cult status he was given a stupid back story and his family was retrofitted into the prologue trilogy and his father Jango was the source of the clone armies which… I think was a video game and a justification for Carrie Fisher utterly idiotic line in the very first movie “you fought with my father in the Clone Wars”. I don’t really get what the “Clone Wars” were… just something to make that dumb line fit in, I think.

    So, no, there is utterly no reason a non-fan or an ambivalent watcher should understand this. I’m certainly no a fan and I guess I never would have heard of him except I’ve got the meta-curiosity of factoid trend tidbit of a trivia fan. I know of him for the same reason I know of Buster Browns dog, Tige. I guess.

    But I think the multitudes of people who *are* Star Wars fans and pop culture buzz, does make an obscure but cult reference like this perfectly legit. If folks like us don’t get it, well, …. it wasn’t written for us.

  12. “Bill, if you are such a non-fan, how did you even know it was a Star Wars reference?”

    You pick things up: who DOESN’T know names from movies and tv shows they’ve never watched?

  13. who DOESN’T know names from movies and tv shows they’ve never watched?

    I’ve picked up that there was a rather famous but struggling boxer named something like Jake Clamato and nicknamed “Bull”. And the semi-fact movie about him, “Raging Bull”, is adored by some fans and critics, but I will never see, since it seems to be celebrated mostly for how beaten-up they were able show the star being subjected to.

  14. If I remember right, Boba Fett’s canonical back story is in the “Star Wars Holiday Special”.

  15. “You pick things up: who DOESN’T know names from movies and tv shows they’ve never watched?”

    Well, that sort of was my point. You pick up names and details. Now there will always be those who do not pick up fewer things and don’t know them. So how much is expected to know. Is -In Star Wars Boba Fett is a bounty hunter who was the basis of clone storm troopers- common enough to make a joke? Well, there will be those who don’t be does the cartoonist care? Probably not.

    I figure I’m probably less of a Star Wars fan than average and *I* knew it. But I imagine it is age related. If you didn’t see the second trilogy and aren’t a fan and didn’t hear your friends talk about it you won’t know this. If you are over 45 then not seeing the second trilogy, not being a fan, and not hearing friends is highly likely. If you are under 35 then it is damned near impossible (especially not hearing friends talk– or run across chatter on the internet or so…).

  16. re “You pick things up: who DOESN’T know names from movies and tv shows they’ve never watched?”

    Back in the day, my go-to source for keeping up on names, basic plot points, standard running jokes etc. on things that I had never seen, heard, or read (and generally never wanted to) was MAD magazine (and to a lesser extent NATIONAL LAMPOON, and parodies on things like THE CAROL BURNETT SHOW). None of that applies now (though, while I almost never go to movies, I do still read or at least skim movie reviews in the local papers, so I still get a few tips).

    Anyway, I knew about Bobba Fett, but don’t think I’d ever heard of Jango Fett. But, as woozy notes, the comic in question wasn’t aimed at my “boring old geezers who don’t care about STAR WARS” niche audience.

  17. “Back in the day, my go-to source … was MAD magazine (… NATIONAL LAMPOON, … THE CAROL BURNETT SHOW). None of that applies now” (emphasis mine).

    I think that one of the keys to becoming a codger. As one ages we simply stop paying attention to these sources. I suppose that is probably natural and has probably always been the case. But one of the things that distinguishes a grouchy old codger from a venerable elder, is an insistence that because *we* no longer users these source or has these references therefore no-one else has any equivalence either.

    The converse is when you say something you think is common knowledge and the youngens look at you oddly and say “How could you know that? Did you *read* that thing?” and you fluster “I don’t know; it’s just common knowledge” and the you realize you learned it from a Hostess Fruit Pie single page comic ad in an old Flash comic book and they say well, no-one can be expected to learn or remember anything form those and you get flustered and say, well, it wasn’t just that *one* thing; it was just… other places and …., you… you … pick things up… you know… and they say “Yeah, but that’s really obscure” and the conversation goes in circles.

  18. Similar to Woozy – when I was girl there were a lot of movies/TV shows that I did not see, many as my parents did not think them age appropriate -such as “Charade”. But I knew all about them from reading “Mad”. First time I saw Charade I knew what was happening due to having read Mad.

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